rhetoric

The art of persuasion by public speaking. This was studied intensively in the Hellenistic and Roman world, and the gospels and the epistles of Paul reflect some of the techniques that had to be mastered. Amongst the teaching methods of Jesus, his use of parables was pre-eminent. The gospels employ the standard rhetorical device of comparison: Jesus is shown to be greater than Moses (the greatest of the Hebrews), and John the Baptist, the Temple, Jonah [[➝ Jonah, book of]], and Solomon. The purpose is to enhance the significance of Jesus. Paul's epistles, though written for particular needs and with characteristics not unlike many of the personal notes and business letters discovered in papyri [[➝ papyrus]] from the Egyptian desert, are not without rhetorical devices, e.g. Philemon 11, 2 Cor. 6:4 ff.; 2 Cor. 11:22 ff.

Dictionary of the Bible.

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  • Rhetoric — Rhet o*ric, n. [F. rh[ e]torique, L. rhetorica, Gr. ???? (sc. ???), fr. ??? rhetorical, oratorical, fr. ??? orator, rhetorician; perhaps akin to E. word; cf. ??? to say.] 1. The art of composition; especially, elegant composition in prose. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rhetoric — ► NOUN 1) the art of effective or persuasive speaking or writing. 2) language with a persuasive or impressive effect, but often lacking sincerity or meaningful content. ORIGIN from Greek rh torik tekhn art of rhetoric …   English terms dictionary

  • rhetoric — I (insincere language) noun affectation, artificial eloquence, bombastic speech, declamation, euphuism, grandiloquence, grandiosity, inflated language, loftiness, magniloquence, pomposity, pompous speech, pompousness, pretension, pretentiousness… …   Law dictionary

  • rhetoric — (n.) c.1300, from O.Fr. rethorique, from L. rhetorice, from Gk. rhetorike techne art of an orator, from rhetor (gen. rhetoros) orator, related to rhema word, lit. that which is spoken, from PIE *wre tor , from root *were to speak (Cf. O.E …   Etymology dictionary

  • rhetoric — [n] wordiness; long speech address, balderdash*, big talk*, bombast, composition, discourse, elocution, eloquence, flowery language, fustian, grandiloquence, hot air*, hyperbole, magniloquence, oration, oratory, pomposity, rant, verbosity;… …   New thesaurus

  • rhetoric — [ret′ər ik] n. [ME rethorike < OFr or L: OFr rethorique < L rhetorica < Gr rhētorikē (technē), rhetorical (art) < rhētōr, orator: see RHETOR] 1. a) the art of using words effectively in speaking or writing; esp., now, the art of prose …   English World dictionary

  • Rhetoric — This article is about the art of rhetoric in general. For the work by Aristotle, see Rhetoric (Aristotle). Painting depicting a lecture in a knight academy, painted by Pieter Isaacsz or Reinhold Timm for Rosenborg Castle as part of a series of… …   Wikipedia

  • rhetoric — /ret euhr ik/, n. 1. (in writing or speech) the undue use of exaggeration or display; bombast. 2. the art or science of all specialized literary uses of language in prose or verse, including the figures of speech. 3. the study of the effective… …   Universalium

  • rhetoric — noun 1) a form of rhetoric Syn: oratory, eloquence, command of language, way with words 2) empty rhetoric Syn: bombast, turgidity, grandiloquence, magniloquence, pomposity, extravagant language, purple prose; …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • rhetoric — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ empty, mere ▪ Her speech was just empty rhetoric. ▪ fiery, inflammatory, powerful, radical ▪ …   Collocations dictionary

  • rhetoric — rhet|o|ric [ retərık ] noun uncount * a style of speaking or writing that is intended to influence people: angry nationalist rhetoric anti American rhetoric the rhetoric of freedom/reform/law and order a. a style of speaking or writing that is… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

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